Tool for this type of flare

Started by tmsmini, March 12, 2022, 08:11:45 PM

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tmsmini

It is not really a flare, but more an acorn to keep a hose on.
I have a Mastercool flare tool and I thought maybe forming a flare partway might come close.

This is a fuel line from a 327 Holley, but I want to do the same on the Mini

MiniDave

Seems like a partial or bubble flare would work?
Complete failure at retirement

1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
2014 Audi Allroad

cstudep

I have done it before with just the first step of the double flare or a bubble flare, not perfect but is more secure than just clamping to flat tube. I have never seen a tool specifically for those fuel line flares but maybe one exists?

MiniDave

#3
They do exist - sort of - it rolls a bead on the end of the tube......the good ones are spendy and it's hard to find one for 5/16 or 1/4" tubing.....tho they are out there.

Complete failure at retirement

1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
2014 Audi Allroad

94touring

Just a standard flare tool should give you the lip you need to ensure a hose doesn't slip off.


tmsmini

That on is a little out of my price range.
Tests with partial flares are mixed so far, a little more practice on when to stop

tmsmini

This is the best I could do. There was a GM specific fuel line flare I thought would work, but it was not any better

94touring

If the goal is just to prevent hose slippage, that will do it. No way a hose clamp is jumping that lip.

tmsmini

Practiced a little more on the GM connector flare.
I am trying to plumb the engine test stand for an external pump and swirl pot to use with injection fuel pressure. The swirl pot came with flared fittings and the fuel filter has stubs for its fittings that need to be flared.


cstudep

You can also get fairly cheap tools to do the 37 degree flare for AN fittings if you wanted to go the route of being able to fasten it all together that way.

tmsmini

Some great suggestions, thank you.
I have AN fittings on the car, but thought I could skip them for the test stand, maybe I will rethink that.

bikewiz

You need the Graham Tool Co beading tool. This bead was done in seamless stainless tubing.

94touring

Quote from: bikewiz on March 23, 2022, 08:20:28 PM
You need the Graham Tool Co beading tool. This bead was done in seamless stainless tubing.

That's slick.  Makes me want to get one.

tmsmini


MiniDave

Jeez louise, $200......

I'd be all over one of those if I could get one for $50 or so......

That is a slick tool tho, and it sure does a nice job.  77.gif
Complete failure at retirement

1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
2014 Audi Allroad

tmsmini

Practice makes better, not perfect but functional

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