Spray guns

Started by jeff10049, June 10, 2018, 10:06:48 PM

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jeff10049

I started this thread to discuss spray paint guns types, tip sizes, brands, etc...

First off just got a new clear gun.

Behold the Iwata Super Nova.
This thing is amazing the atomization is so good it lays down the clear like glass only buffing needed is to remove dirt nibs.
The spray coming out of it looks more like steam its so well atomized.
It really hoses out some material too you gotta move do not hesitate or it will run. I like that as I can't stand a slow gun I never run less than full out on the fluid unless for tight areas detail work on any gun.

This gun has saved its cost in the two jobs sprayed already just in time and abrasive cost saved for the color sanding.

Best Deal I have seen is here.https://megadepot.com/product/anest-iwata-5935-supernova-ls400-1305-spray-gun?format=v&p=ms&source=ads&gclid=Cj0KCQjwmPPYBRCgARIsALOziANNR2N4MK5-w169cViEJg3gKNoOY42-srJB-kTDIragH3XPC-eh6ykaAikEEALw_wcB



94touring

What had you been using as a clear gun?

I know when I switched to a devilbis plus, my work drastically improved.  Old gun just didn't flow or atomize nearly as well.  I use a 1.2mm tip for basecoat/clearcoat. 

MiniDave

A $600 gun only makes sense for those guys trying to do professional production work......I'm glad that it does such a great job, nothing like having the right tool for the work when you're trying to make a living.
Complete failure at retirement

1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
2014 Audi Allroad

94touring

Cost me a few hundred just in plastic cups and filters every time I replenish my supplies!  I think I paid in the neighborhood of 600 for my gun as well.  I like the multiple tips I can swap out on my gun for various materials as well.  Bought a 1.7 tip for filler primer.  Anything that reduces the hell that is color sanding and buffing is well worth it!

jeff10049

Quote from: MiniDave on June 11, 2018, 11:40:29 AM
A $600 gun only makes sense for those guys trying to do professional production work......I'm glad that it does such a great job, nothing like having the right tool for the work when you're trying to make a living.

I used to think that but I learned a long time ago that's not true with painting.
And $600 is way less than just the primer, sealer, base coat, clear coat, abrasives and masking supplies to paint just one mini.

That and hobbyist or professional the pure hell of color sanding is not worth it the less needed the better.
It would be nothing to spend 40 hours on a poorly sprayed mini in color sanding time. That and the extra materials more than make up for a decent gun.


jeff10049

Quote from: 94touring on June 11, 2018, 06:18:29 AM
What had you been using as a clear gun?

I know when I switched to a devilbis plus, my work drastically improved.  Old gun just didn't flow or atomize nearly as well.  I use a 1.2mm tip for basecoat/clearcoat.

Old Clear gun was Old school sata RP good gun damn good but nothing like this supernova.

jeff10049

Keep in mind If you're just wanting to paint your mini don't let this discourage you the spray gun is the cheapest part of the paint job even if you only do it once. Just get a good used sata rp off eBay it's worth the $200.
I did a show winning job with a harbor freight purple HVLP gun. Don't do this took me weeks to color sand to a good job not worth it.
Just pointing out a $12.00 gun can NOT  produce good results but you can cut and buff your way to them with just about anything.
But at least get something decent save the headaches and wasted time and materials.

94touring

Ha, it is always a victorious moment when you spray your clear and have just minimal dust nubs to sand out.  No one knows how much sanding and work is involved in a paintjob till you do it once. 

MiniDave

That's why I don't do paint and body work....I just don't have the patience and I'm too much of a perfectionist.

So that brings me to a paint question that I've asked Dan before but I'd like to throw out to the general P&B group. When you guys paint a car you do it in chunks. first the main part, then later the doors, bonnet and boot.....

My question is - when you do it this way although easier, how can you get the same results? Different day, different temp, humidity, dust in the air, wind direction - different angle of the gun to the panels, in the case of metallic maybe they don't lay the exact same way. Point being, it won't match really, will it?

I understand doing the underside, boot and interior, door jambs and such separate, but the factory paints the whole exterior at one time - why don't you?
Complete failure at retirement

1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
2014 Audi Allroad

gr8kornholio

Quote from: MiniDave on June 12, 2018, 06:44:07 AM
That's why I don't do paint and body work....I just don't have the patience and I'm too much of a perfectionist.

Same here, which was re-affirmed when I tried to strip my car.

I am the GR8KORNHOLIO! Are you threatening me?

Saussie Aussie 1965 Australian MK1 Mini.
"Beavis" - 07 MY/MY MCS, B/MY Konig Daylites, JCW sideskirts, TSW springs, TSW lower rear control arms -- Exploring the country with new friends since 11/09.

94touring

Lol yeah Mark was like this sucks, here's money.

MiniDave

#11
 ;D ;D ;D ;D   77.gif

Well I did completely sand blast and strip my Jag, inside and out - and did all of the rust repairs and metal work, but I left the paint and final prep to the pros. I'll do the same with my hot rod Mini - at least to the semi-pro! 

(Wait - I guess if you get paid for it you are a pro?)

But to return to the topic, I can always see using the right tool for the job, cheap bad tools give cheap bad results, or require so much rework as to make it not cost effective.....that's why I have drawers full of Snap-On and Craftsman tools from when I was using them to make my living - and not the chinesium ones Crafsftman sells now - god those are horrible! The Pittsburg brand Harbor Freight sells are ten times better than those!
Complete failure at retirement

1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
2014 Audi Allroad

94touring

I'm loaded with Pittsburg tools, they actually work good.  Anything pneumatic I fork out money for though.  HF has the 10 inch foam buffing pads I like too. 

gr8kornholio

Quote from: MiniDave on June 12, 2018, 06:44:07 AM
So that brings me to a paint question that I've asked Dan before but I'd like to throw out to the general P&B group. When you guys paint a car you do it in chunks. first the main part, then later the doors, bonnet and boot.....

My question is - when you do it this way although easier, how can you get the same results? Different day, different temp, humidity, dust in the air, wind direction - different angle of the gun to the panels, in the case of metallic maybe they don't lay the exact same way. Point being, it won't match really, will it?

I understand doing the underside, boot and interior, door jambs and such separate, but the factory paints the whole exterior at one time - why don't you?

My comment distracted from Dave's question, which I'm curious about too.  As I've seen cars for sale with doors or other panels that don't seem to match.
I am the GR8KORNHOLIO! Are you threatening me?

Saussie Aussie 1965 Australian MK1 Mini.
"Beavis" - 07 MY/MY MCS, B/MY Konig Daylites, JCW sideskirts, TSW springs, TSW lower rear control arms -- Exploring the country with new friends since 11/09.

jeff10049

solid colors can be painted apart most of the time and match. You do however need to buy enough paint all at once to avoid mixing variations .

Metallics can hose you higher air pressure or hotter temp = lighter color. Lower pressure or lower temp =  darker color. The direction of spray can even change a metallic best to paint together.

I painted my 50 chevy cab separate but very small areas show and all curved panel areas so they reflect light different anyway so i can get away with it all the rest will be painted at the same time.

Take a look at most newer car bumpers they suck bad like 10 shades off they don't even come close to looking the right color even though its the same paint. They are painted separate and laid down we have repainted lots for customers just to get a better match just painting them in the correct orientation helps a lot.

MiniDave

#15
There is a red Frogeye Sprite for sale on BaT with a fresh red paint job, it looks like at least three different colors of red to my eyes.....solid color but probably painted in several different goes?

I remember a friend who worked at the Jaguar dealership in the body shop, he claimed to be a "panel painter", and when he painted his own XJ6, it came out in several different shades  - and here was a guy who was a professional painter, with a high tech spray booth and the latest and greatest in paint mixing and spray guns......
Complete failure at retirement

1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
2014 Audi Allroad

94touring

#16
Dave on my blue mini I'm about to respray in a darker blue, I'll be spraying over the existing blue.  However I have new door skins and I'll be spraying over primer grey on those.  As a result I'll have primer grey on the A-panels and grey on the first 3rd or so on the rear quarter panels.  This is to blend any color variations and tie it all together. In fact will give a grey primer highlight around the new boot and bonnet paneling too for the same reason. No need to primer the whole car and waste money on materials.  When I repaired my rx7 I had to paint the whole front end to the doors.  I only sprayed new red about halfway down the door to blend.  It probably would have matched either way, but it's easier to blend and have it unoticable to the eye than risk it not matching and painting the whole car in that situation.  Pattons solid skittles orange mini didn't match on the doors when it was all said and done. I ended up respraying the whole side of the car with a new batch of the same paint and blended the same way.  It was so far off the first time, and was solid, I still have no idea why.  Bad luck sometimes. 

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